Authenticity

A place anchored in the past

In old writings, dating from as early as 1070, there is mention of ‘Wanga’ (old Germanic for ‘slope’, ‘slight slope’) in reference to the place where the village and the farm are presently located.

In the 13th century, the ‘chateau de Wanghe’ was built on a peninsula in the river. The current farm was built in 1735 on the old foundations of this castle.

In the 17th and 18th centuries, the vast fields around Wange became the bloody battlegrounds of the then great powers. The history of Europe was written here, in part during the short but intense battles that were fought. The tapestry of Blenheim Palace in England, illustrating the Breakthrough of the Brabant Lines, depicts the image of the castle of Wange on the site where the farm is presently located. The warlords and generals stayed here in preparation for the battle. Silent witnesses of these events emerged when the stable floor was dug out and the foundation examined: various cannon and rifle bullets.

Treasure hunters still regularly find remains of the battles in the fields and meadows around the farmstead.

The Kasteelhoeve, including the village of Wange, was owned by the de Lieminghe family during the entire 17th century. In the 18th century, the well-known Brussels family Arconati-Visconti, who also owned the castle of Gaasbeek, inherited the domain, and used the farmstead as “Heerlijkheid” (outdoor residence).

On the farm, there has been intensive farming for at least three hundred years. Horses have always occupied a prominent place on the farm. In the first half of the last century, there was a stable with twelve large draft horses and a horse racing track on the meadows.

The inhabitants of Wange were closely connected with the farm until the 1950s. Small farmers with a small piece of land were allowed to use horses and equipment from the farm in exchange for work on the farm.

In the 60s of the last century, the Avermaete family buys the farm and focuses on arable farming and fruit growing. The lady of the house pioneers in 1994 with a Bed and Breakfast in the outbuildings.

Historic locations nearby

The tomb of Pepin of Landen (ca. 580 | 5 min.)

On this site near Landen, archaeological excavations have unearthed 2 graves and a well from the Merovingian period (second half of the 7th century) and remnants of an old chapel from the 8th century. On the same domain there is also a ‘motte’, a defence hill from the 13th century. The ‘motte’ is popularly called the ‘tomb of Pepin’. This hill with a diameter of 40 metres and a height of 11 metres refers to the domain where Pepin of Landen, the first Merovingian king, was born and probably lived in a former Roman village. The remains of a ring moat from the 12th century are still visible on the site.

Zoutleeuw (5 min.)

Zoutleeuw is one of the most beautifully preserved medieval cities in our country. The inhabitants of Zoutleeuw can boast a beautiful town hall, a cloth hall and the Gothic St. Leonard’s Church built from local Gobertange stone. The church and the waning city are spared from the Iconoclasm of 1566 and the looting during the French Revolution in 1789, allowing the church to gather an impressive collection of religious art throughout the centuries. The showpiece of the church is the Sacrament Tower from 1552. It is eighteen metres high, and has nine floors with two hundred statues depicting bible scenes.

The ‘Brakouter’ (2 min.)

The Brakouter is one of the largest open plains in Flanders. It borders the villages Ezemaal, Laar, Neerwinden, Overwinden, Racour, Lincent, Opheylissem and Neerheylissem. It was here that the French armies lined up during the two major battles of Neerwinden in 1693 and 1793..

Longa, The Roman road (5 min.)

In the neighbouring village of Ezemaal, there is an important remnant of the well-preserved Roman road that ran from Tienen to Tongeren. This beautiful hollow road is one of the deepest and most beautiful in Flanders. Its banks run up to 10 meters high. This listed monument continues to exert a special charm, mainly because of its size, its microclimate, its gallery-like vegetation and, above all, the tranquillity it exudes. The Laar Walk (14 km) starts from the Kasteelhoeve and runs through the ‘Longa’.

Tongeren (35 min.)

Tongeren, the place where Ambiorix, chief of the Eburones, inflicted a heavy defeat on the Roman legion. The Romans, however, later succeeded in establishing their authority. Tongeren became a real Roman city, situated at the junction of important military roads. Presently, Tongeren is home to the Gallo-Roman museum, one of the leading archaeological museums in Europe.

The tomb of Pepin of Landen

ca. 580 (5 min.)
On this site near Landen, archaeological excavations have unearthed 2 graves and a well from the Merovingian period (second half of the 7th century) and remnants of an old chapel from the 8th century. On the same domain there is also a 'motte', a defence hill from the 13th century. The 'motte' is popularly called the 'tomb of Pepin'. This hill with a diameter of 40 metres and a height of 11 metres refers to the domain where Pepin of Landen, the first Merovingian king, was born and probably lived in a former Roman village. The remains of a ring moat from the 12th century are still visible on the site.

Zoutleeuw

(5 min.)
Zoutleeuw is one of the most beautifully preserved medieval cities in our country. The inhabitants of Zoutleeuw can boast a beautiful town hall, a cloth hall and the Gothic St. Leonard's Church built from local Gobertange stone. The church and the waning city are spared from the Iconoclasm of 1566 and the looting during the French Revolution in 1789, allowing the church to gather an impressive collection of religious art throughout the centuries. The showpiece of the church is the Sacrament Tower from 1552. It is eighteen metres high, and has nine floors with two hundred statues depicting bible scenes.

The 'Brakouter'

(2 min.)
The Brakouter is one of the largest open plains in Flanders. It borders the villages Ezemaal, Laar, Neerwinden, Overwinden, Racour, Lincent, Opheylissem and Neerheylissem. It was here that the French armies lined up during the two major battles of Neerwinden in 1693 and 1793..

Longa, The Roman road

(5 min.)
In the neighbouring village of Ezemaal, there is an important remnant of the well-preserved Roman road that ran from Tienen to Tongeren. This beautiful hollow road is one of the deepest and most beautiful in Flanders. Its banks run up to 10 meters high. This listed monument continues to exert a special charm, mainly because of its size, its microclimate, its gallery-like vegetation and, above all, the tranquillity it exudes. The Laar Walk (14 km) starts from the Kasteelhoeve and runs through the 'Longa'.

Tongeren

(35 min.)
Tongeren, the place where Ambiorix, chief of the Eburones, inflicted a heavy defeat on the Roman legion. The Romans, however, later succeeded in establishing their authority. Tongeren became a real Roman city, situated at the junction of important military roads. Presently, Tongeren is home to the Gallo-Roman museum, one of the leading archaeological museums in Europe.